Addiction

Addiction Seminar CME / CPD 

Full Course:  20 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits for CME / CEU / CPD

Short Course:  10 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits for CME / CEU / CPD

Course(s) are appropriate for:  Subspecialist Physicians, Family Practitioners, Internists, General Practitioners, Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, and Physician Assistants (PA-C's)

Series 2 (ADC2) Topics Include:  Diagnose Substance Abuse, Action of Amphetamines, Signs and Symptoms, Opioid Addiction, Club Drugs, and more. 

To view topic outline of the full or short course, select the Course Type (Full or Short) below:

Full Course:
ADC2
Full Course Price:
$580
Short Course:
ADC2A, ADC2B
Short Course Price:
$485
Format:
Available in Audio format.

Course Topics

Update on Substance Abuse

Recognize the unique physiology and subsequent behavior characteristics of adolescents that influence vulnerability to substance use disorders; Identify the desired effects and adverse effects of popular substances of abuse; Use screening tools most likely to identify substance use in adolescents; List the active ingredients in various substances and evaluate their potential for addiction; Correlate signs and symptoms exhibited by patients with particular substances of abuse.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Treating Opioid Addiction: What Psychiatrists Should Know

Summarize the scope and causes of the epidemic of opioid addiction in the United States; Recognize risk factors for misuse of opioids; Manage maintenance therapy for a patient with substance use disorder who is using opioids Explain the pharmacology of buprenorphine-naloxone; Advise a colleague about management of a pregnant woman with opioid addiction.

Update on Cocaine and Methamphetamine Use Disorder

Summarize the changes in the brain caused by chronic use of cocaine and methamphetamine; List common cardiovascular and psychiatric effects of addiction to cocaine or methamphetamine; Illustrate the relationship between the route of administration of cocaine and the addictive potential of the drug; Explain recent findings supporting combination pharmacologic treatment for amphetamine use disorder; Define addiction in psychiatric terms and in an animal model.

Sugar, Hormones, and Addiction

Discuss physiologic processes in the brain that are common to obesity and substance addiction; Explain the role of leptin and insulin in the reward system; Evaluate claims that food additives, such as salt, fat, and sugar, are addictive; Question the validity of classifying substances as generally recognized as safe; Distinguish the neurotransmitters involved in the sensation of pleasure from those associated with happiness.

Overdoses

Treat patients who have taken an overdose of over-the-counter pain medication; Identify the antidotes for various substances commonly seen in overdose situations; List the substances for which intravenous lipid therapy is used; Determine when hemodialysis is an appropriate treatment for overdose; Effectively care for children poisoned with
clonidine tablets or patches.

QUALIFIES FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES and QUALIFIES FOR CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Update on Substance Abuse

Evaluate acute effects of intoxication caused by the use of Molly, synthetic cathinones, synthetic cannabinoids, and other club drugs; Recognize the near-withdrawal state associated with days following the use of Molly or MDMA; List negative short- and long-term effects associated with the use of club drugs, marijuana, and opioids.; Cite data on the relationship between marijuana use and an increased risk for schizophrenia, particularly in patients with other risk factors; Assess the utility of the SBIRT paradigm in daily clinical practice with pediatric patients and families.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Addiction Trends and Treatment in the United States

List criteria for SUD as listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition); Explain trends in substance use among adolescents; Differentiate among various forms of cannabis; Compare substance use and treatment in men and women; Choose an effective environment for treatment of substance abuse based on patient age and other characteristics.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

The Opioid Crisis in America

Recognize the physician's role in managing the current opioid crisis; Discourage stigmatization of patients who become addicted to opioids; Consider the perspectives of government, third-party payers, and policy makers with regard to prescription of opioids; Advocate for changes in policy aimed at improving the monitoring and treatment of opioid addiction; Eliminate prescribing practices that perpetuate opioid addiction.

QUALIFIES FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

Substance Use Disorders

Screen for and diagnose substance use disorders; Recommend pharmacologic management for a patient with an alcohol use disorder; Interpret a urine toxicology screen; Taper a patient off of long-term opioid use; Recognize forms of substance abuse that are most common in women.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Neuroscience of Addiction for Psychologists

Distinguish between sensitization and tolerance; Explain the mechanism of action of amphetamines; List characteristics of commonly abused opioids; Identify a patient who is under the influence of phencyclidine; Counsel patients on the risks associated with designer drugs such as synthetic cannabinoids and "bath salts."

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Update on Substance Abuse

Recognize the unique physiology and subsequent behavior characteristics of adolescents that influence vulnerability to substance use disorders; Identify the desired effects and adverse effects of popular substances of abuse; Use screening tools most likely to identify substance use in adolescents; List the active ingredients in various substances and evaluate their potential for addiction; Correlate signs and symptoms exhibited by patients with particular substances of abuse.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Treating Opioid Addiction: What Psychiatrists Should Know

Summarize the scope and causes of the epidemic of opioid addiction in the United States; Recognize risk factors for misuse of opioids; Manage maintenance therapy for a patient with substance use disorder who is using opioids Explain the pharmacology of buprenorphine-naloxone; Advise a colleague about management of a pregnant woman with opioid addiction.

The Opioid Crisis in America

Recognize the physician's role in managing the current opioid crisis; Discourage stigmatization of patients who become addicted to opioids; Consider the perspectives of government, third-party payers, and policy makers with regard to prescription of opioids; Advocate for changes in policy aimed at improving the monitoring and treatment of opioid addiction; Eliminate prescribing practices that perpetuate opioid addiction.

QUALIFIES FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

Substance Use Disorders

Screen for and diagnose substance use disorders; Recommend pharmacologic management for a patient with an alcohol use disorder; Interpret a urine toxicology screen; Taper a patient off of long-term opioid use; Recognize forms of substance abuse that are most common in women.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Neuroscience of Addiction for Psychologists

Distinguish between sensitization and tolerance; Explain the mechanism of action of amphetamines; List characteristics of commonly abused opioids; Identify a patient who is under the influence of phencyclidine; Counsel patients on the risks associated with designer drugs such as synthetic cannabinoids and "bath salts."

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Update on Cocaine and Methamphetamine Use Disorder

Summarize the changes in the brain caused by chronic use of cocaine and methamphetamine; List common cardiovascular and psychiatric effects of addiction to cocaine or methamphetamine; Illustrate the relationship between the route of administration of cocaine and the addictive potential of the drug; Explain recent findings supporting combination pharmacologic treatment for amphetamine use disorder; Define addiction in psychiatric terms and in an animal model.

Sugar, Hormones, and Addiction

Discuss physiologic processes in the brain that are common to obesity and substance addiction; Explain the role of leptin and insulin in the reward system; Evaluate claims that food additives, such as salt, fat, and sugar, are addictive; Question the validity of classifying substances as generally recognized as safe; Distinguish the neurotransmitters involved in the sensation of pleasure from those associated with happiness.

Overdoses

Treat patients who have taken an overdose of over-the-counter pain medication; Identify the antidotes for various substances commonly seen in overdose situations; List the substances for which intravenous lipid therapy is used; Determine when hemodialysis is an appropriate treatment for overdose; Effectively care for children poisoned with
clonidine tablets or patches.

QUALIFIES FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES and QUALIFIES FOR CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Update on Substance Abuse

Evaluate acute effects of intoxication caused by the use of Molly, synthetic cathinones, synthetic cannabinoids, and other club drugs; Recognize the near-withdrawal state associated with days following the use of Molly or MDMA; List negative short- and long-term effects associated with the use of club drugs, marijuana, and opioids.; Cite data on the relationship between marijuana use and an increased risk for schizophrenia, particularly in patients with other risk factors; Assess the utility of the SBIRT paradigm in daily clinical practice with pediatric patients and families.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Addiction Trends and Treatment in the United States

List criteria for SUD as listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition); Explain trends in substance use among adolescents; Differentiate among various forms of cannabis; Compare substance use and treatment in men and women; Choose an effective environment for treatment of substance abuse based on patient age and other characteristics.

QUALIFIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Additional Information

Additional Continuing Medical Education options available:

Other courses of interest may include:  Women's HealthMen's HealthFamily PracticeInternal MedicinePsychiatry and Nutrition

If you have taken the current Addiction CME / CPD Review listed above or if you are seeking additional credits, please visit: Medical Courses Coming Soon There you will find abbreviated listings of additional courses available related to this specialty and courses that are soon to be released.

For over 30 years, ASI has provided Continuing Medical Education, CME & CEU and Continuing Professional Development Education (CPD) for physicians and allied professionals in Addiction plus over 40 other specialties and subspecialties.  Lectures are recorded annually at the top seminars and conferences to provide the most current medical education to our clients.